Posts Tagged‘promotional video’

Impact Video Production team

Event Video Production: 7 Essential Shooting Tips

Speaker from behind at conferenceEvent video production can be very demanding for videographers. Not least because the initial brief is often very loose: ‘capture the atmosphere’ or ‘film what you find interesting’. The most important thing to remember is; nobody else cares whether you’re getting the shots you need or not. Nine times out of ten you’re there as an add-on, to capture the main event without disrupting anything or anyone. With this in mind we’ve compiled some event video essential shooting tips.

1. Be nice

As anyone in the business will attest to, staying positive and polite will serve you well. If you step on someone’s toes; apologise, keep smiling and keep working. If you get bawled out by someone important, just get on with it – a thick skin is a must. In event video production your job is to blend into the surroundings while being right where the action is, so be gracious at all times. You are much more likely to be granted favours if you keep a smile on your face.

2. Be flexible

You are nowhere near the most important person in the room so be prepared to have your plans and preparations scuppered by last minute changes. The priority is for the event to run smoothly and the videographer should do everything possible to adapt to any on-the-fly requests. Excuses or stubbornness might be justifiable but in the end you will be judged by your final product and how pleasant you are to work with.

3. Be prepared

For anything! Low light, background noise, whatever you have to deal with. Not bringing a versatile kit won’t stand with your client. So find out everything you can about the space beforehand; the light, the ambiance, the run of show. Even if interviews weren’t included in the brief, come prepared with your mic and lights. Be prepared to work autonomously too.

4. Be patient

The biggest pitfall in reactive event video production is shooting too much. When there’s no specific brief the temptation is to get total coverage of the event, but this can result in double or triple the editing time. Consider each shot before you hit record, are you really going to use this angle, or can you get a better one? Editing in your head while shooting is an important skill for event video production.

5. Push the client

Often a client can shy away from capturing a certain moment or scene if they think it’s invasive. It’s your job to encourage them to make it happen. If you can see it will help in the video to get that interview, or get back stage, tell them how important it is. Often they just need a little push, or don’t realise how valuable a certain shot could be to the event video. In this sense you need to lead the client on what is and isn’t worthwhile. Sometimes that means saying no too.

6. Don’t be shy

If you don’t ask you don’t get: as true for event video production as anything. It’s no gig for shrinking violets; when a client asks why a certain shot isn’t in the rushes, the last thing you want is to regret not being more forward.

7. It’s easier to ask forgiveness than permission.   wink

 

Get in touch with marliese@impactvideoproduction.co.uk to talk about your next event video production.

Director's board of The Departure production

Short Film in Theatre

The recent confluence of short film and theatre heralds an exciting step in digital storytelling for theatre. Long before the advent of YouTube theatre companies were experimenting with video production to advertise their work. Now, in 2015, almost every new stage production has a trailer.

But a more recent and interesting development is the use of the short film format as an extension of the stage play; a fresh interpretation of the themes. As a form of digital content marketing it’s what marketing moguls call digital storytelling; extending the conversation beyond the live performance for existing audiences and involving new audiences.

It’s no coincidence that this trend mirrors the the rapid ascension of the short film format as a mainstream art form. Online, audiences are more accessible than ever and the amount of online video they consume grows astronomically each year. Branded or otherwise, the amount of video hours watched by people on YouTube  is increasing by 50% every year*.

In response to this trend, the BBC launched iPlayer Shorts last year, a series of six short films to be produced over two years by new filmmaking talent. Head of TV content at iPlayer said the venture “Explores storytelling outside of a scheduled TV slot or duration. Audiences will be able to discover, share and enjoy these dramas whenever and wherever they choose.” Three of the films have been made and are available on the iPlayer now.

bbc i player

Theatre makers who have worked for a while with video production have cottoned on to the broad appeal and accessibility of the short film format. In 2014 The Royal Court Theatre collaborated with The Guardian to produce six short films responding to six current British issues. ‘Off The Page’ short films are all viewable here on the guardian website.

The Guardian describes them as ‘microplays’ conceived as a meeting of minds between journalists and theatre makers and it’s encouraging to see how theatre makers are using the medium to generate interest around their craft and in new writing.

Young Vic Shorts is another high visibility stage to screen program – again in collaboration with The Guardian – but it differs slightly in that it uses the short film format to directly extend the narrative or reinterpret a stage play that’s currently on stage. Since 2012 the Young Vic has created six short films to accompany their main house productions. Find the full set here.

Their most recent short was The Departure, inspired by Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, in which Gillian Anderson directs and stars, and for which we were commissioned to make a behind the scenes video (below).

There’s no doubt these high profile collaborations are bringing new audiences to the theatre as well as spotlighting new playwrights. The exciting part for existing theatre audiences is that by embracing the visual language of filmmaking, creators are reinterpreting and refreshing, instead of simply repeating. Audiences’ have a huge appetite for digital storytelling across platforms, and short film is an ultra-accessible medium ripe for experimentation.

At Impact Video we are interested in producing film content that responds to theatre using cinematic language. Get in touch with  marliese@impactvideoproduction.co.uk to talk about theatre trailers, short film, or other collaborations.

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